Urban Apologetics by Christopher Brooks gives us a framework for how believers are to engage culture without suppressing convictions in the urban context. The book helps us see that the gospel can be contextualized and applied to the pressing concerns in our neighborhoods.

Brooks contends that proclamation and practice are not mutually exclusive, and “our mission is to present a Christianity that is as concerned with human flourishing as it is with doctrinal orthodoxy” (p. 30). Brooks adds,

“Effective urban evangelism requires that you avoid the presumption that the people you witness to will be hearing the good news for the first time. Furthermore, it will prove very beneficial for you to identify the personal barriers they have in their hearts and minds to believe in the gospel.”

(p. 50)

This resource will help the church grow in incarnational ministry. Brooks speaks to the need for believers to have a holistic approach to urban ministry:

“When there are inconsistencies between our belief and our behavior, we leave the door wide open for skepticism to arise in the hearts of those who look to us as models of faith .”

(p. 128)

Urban Apologetics helps us understand that apologetics is more than expounding on our belief system, but it is gospel-empowered behavior and gospel-exalting belief that will ultimately change our communities. Our mission as a church is to contextualize the gospel so that our neighbors can see the gospel expressed and embodied through God’s people. Urban Apologetics is a practical tool for the Church to learn how to apply gospel truth to our ever-changing culture.

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